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Principles Of Becoming The Authority

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When you think about Nick Fury, what comes to mind? Yes, he is a fictional character but he represents what you where you want to be in your career path. Nick Fury has no superpowers yet he heads one of the most powerful organizations in the world and has the world’s greatest superheroes working for him. He is the ultimate authority figure in the  workplace and we can all learn from some his practices. 

Competition for jobs is fierce, and salaries are flat. Whether you are working at the front desk, sales, or in the back office doing support, chances are that you’re working harder than ever just to stay even. When management sees you as part of a team, it’s hard to be noticed, appreciated and — more importantly — rewarded for your hard work. If management only knew the things you could do; if they knew they had an authority instead of a worker.

Brian Horn, co-host of Authority Alchemy, says he has the answer. He uses the following five authority principles to manage his clients’ public images and present each one as an industry leader. You can use the same five authority principles to redefine your value to your employer, your relationship with your job and to position yourself as the authority on your job.

The process begins with a simple redefinition.

Principle 1: I Help vs. I Am

The first thing you need to do is to change the way you think about your job and customers. What your customer or manager really cares about are the results of your work, not how you do what you do or the details around it. If you think of your job as answering phones or fixing stuff, that’s not what your boss wants. Bosses want their problems solved.

One of the easiest ways to redefine what you are and what you do is to start your job description with: “I help…” instead of “I am…”

Imagine that you’re at a party or networking convention (anywhere) and someone walks up to you and says, “Hey, what do you do?” It’s a common question. Rather than saying, “I answer phones…” or “I’m a real estate agent…” or “I’m a computer guy,” try this: Change that statement and make it begin with: “I help…”

This simple change forces you to talk about the results you provide. Defining your role in terms of the benefits you provide will begin positioning you as the guru, the expert, the educator and advocate. An example: A programmer might say, “I’m an SEO engineer” or “I’m a website designer.” A programming guru would say, “I help clients get more customers by making easy-to-find, high-converting websites.”

“I help” forces you to let them know the results you produce. Educating people about what is possible often ends up with people saying, “Oh, really? We need some of that.”

Don’t be the guy walking around trying to impress people. When someone asks what you do, instead of saying, “I’m an SEO strategist. I’m an internet marketer. I’m a web builder,” put it in terms like, “I help our business get more customers.” If you’re a real estate agent who specializes in helping first-time homebuyers, instead of saying “I’m a real estate agent,” you could say, “I help families get into their first house,” or, “I help families go through the process of buying their house if it’s their first time.”

So, put “I help” before saying what you do, whether you’re a receptionist, salesman or support tech. Take the time to develop that statement. Begin with “I help,” and you’ll be forced to define and verbalize the result that your company and coworkers are looking for.

The other half of that question is, “how?” Our programmer might say, “I get more customers by making our website findable online,” or the realtor might say, “I help first time homebuyers through the home-buying process.”

Define those two things, who you help and what you help them do. That makes you define yourself in terms of your passion, rather than a job title people aren’t all that interested in. They want results.

Give it a try. Start it out with “I help.” Make that your avatar, your mantra, and when people ask you what you do, the image you project is that of the expert, the guru, the educator, and the advocate.

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Kanye West Donates $150k To Slain Security Guard Family

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The story of Jemel Roberson is another American tragedy with police violence.

After hearing the story of the security guard gunned down by the cops, Kanye West decided to donate to the family. Kanye made multiple donations of $15,000 via a GoFundMe page that was set up to help Roberson’s family. The page’s goal of $150,000 has been exceeded and currently stands at $302,625.

Witnesses said a Midlothian police officer responding to a shooting inside a south suburban bar shot at the wrong person early Sunday morning.

After security asked a group of drunken men to leave Manny’s Blue Room Bar around 4 a.m. Sunday, witnesses said someone came back with a gun and opened fire. Security returned fire, and according to witnesses, 26-year-old armed security guard Jemel Roberson apprehended one of the men involved outside.

“He had somebody on the ground with his knee in back, with his gun in his back like, ‘Don’t move,'” witness Adam Harris said.

Soon after, witnesses said, an officer responding to the scene fired at Roberson — killing him.

VIA: TMZ

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Iconic Marvel Comics Stan Lee Has Passed Away

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Marvel Comics icon Stan Lee is dead at the age of 95.

Lee, who began in the business in 1939 and created or co-created Black Panther, Spider-Man, the X-Men, the Mighty Thor, Iron Man, the Fantastic Four, the Incredible Hulk, Daredevil and Ant-Man, among countless other characters, died early Monday morning at Cedars-Sinai Medical Center in Los Angeles.

In 2009, The Walt Disney Co. bought Marvel Entertainment for $4 billion, and most of the top-grossing superhero films of all time — led by Avengers: Infinity War‘s $2.05 billion worldwide take earlier this year — have featured Marvel characters.

TMZ reports that Lee was rushed to Cedars-Sinai from his Hollywood Hills home early Monday.

Lee’s wife Joan died last year at the age of 93. They had been married for 69 years.

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Ice Cube and LL Cool J Are In Negotiations To Purchase 22 Sports Stations

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Ice Cube and LL Cool J are ready to start their own sports network.

Cube and Mr. Smith are apart of a group with billionaire Carolyn Rafaelian that are trying to bid for the sports stations Disney has to sell off from their Fox deal.

According to TMZ Sports, Disney got the 22 stations as part of its $71 billion acquisition of 21st Century Fox. But, officials believe that since Disney is already the majority owner of ESPN, controlling the 22 sports stations would give them too much power in the sports TV landscape.

The 22 stations involved in the deal include everything from Fox Sports San Diego to Fox Sports Arizona, Fox Sports Detroit, Fox Sports Southwest and more.

Other potential bidders include private equity firms Apollo Global Management, Blackstone Group and he Sinclair Broadcast Group.

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