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Principles Of Becoming The Authority

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When you think about Nick Fury, what comes to mind? Yes, he is a fictional character but he represents what you where you want to be in your career path. Nick Fury has no superpowers yet he heads one of the most powerful organizations in the world and has the world’s greatest superheroes working for him. He is the ultimate authority figure in the  workplace and we can all learn from some his practices. 

Competition for jobs is fierce, and salaries are flat. Whether you are working at the front desk, sales, or in the back office doing support, chances are that you’re working harder than ever just to stay even. When management sees you as part of a team, it’s hard to be noticed, appreciated and — more importantly — rewarded for your hard work. If management only knew the things you could do; if they knew they had an authority instead of a worker.

Brian Horn, co-host of Authority Alchemy, says he has the answer. He uses the following five authority principles to manage his clients’ public images and present each one as an industry leader. You can use the same five authority principles to redefine your value to your employer, your relationship with your job and to position yourself as the authority on your job.

The process begins with a simple redefinition.

Principle 1: I Help vs. I Am

The first thing you need to do is to change the way you think about your job and customers. What your customer or manager really cares about are the results of your work, not how you do what you do or the details around it. If you think of your job as answering phones or fixing stuff, that’s not what your boss wants. Bosses want their problems solved.

One of the easiest ways to redefine what you are and what you do is to start your job description with: “I help…” instead of “I am…”

Imagine that you’re at a party or networking convention (anywhere) and someone walks up to you and says, “Hey, what do you do?” It’s a common question. Rather than saying, “I answer phones…” or “I’m a real estate agent…” or “I’m a computer guy,” try this: Change that statement and make it begin with: “I help…”

This simple change forces you to talk about the results you provide. Defining your role in terms of the benefits you provide will begin positioning you as the guru, the expert, the educator and advocate. An example: A programmer might say, “I’m an SEO engineer” or “I’m a website designer.” A programming guru would say, “I help clients get more customers by making easy-to-find, high-converting websites.”

“I help” forces you to let them know the results you produce. Educating people about what is possible often ends up with people saying, “Oh, really? We need some of that.”

Don’t be the guy walking around trying to impress people. When someone asks what you do, instead of saying, “I’m an SEO strategist. I’m an internet marketer. I’m a web builder,” put it in terms like, “I help our business get more customers.” If you’re a real estate agent who specializes in helping first-time homebuyers, instead of saying “I’m a real estate agent,” you could say, “I help families get into their first house,” or, “I help families go through the process of buying their house if it’s their first time.”

So, put “I help” before saying what you do, whether you’re a receptionist, salesman or support tech. Take the time to develop that statement. Begin with “I help,” and you’ll be forced to define and verbalize the result that your company and coworkers are looking for.

The other half of that question is, “how?” Our programmer might say, “I get more customers by making our website findable online,” or the realtor might say, “I help first time homebuyers through the home-buying process.”

Define those two things, who you help and what you help them do. That makes you define yourself in terms of your passion, rather than a job title people aren’t all that interested in. They want results.

Give it a try. Start it out with “I help.” Make that your avatar, your mantra, and when people ask you what you do, the image you project is that of the expert, the guru, the educator, and the advocate.

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Culture

Real Life Kwik-E-Mart Is Open For Business

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The Simpson iconic store the Kwik-E-Mart now has a real-world location.

The store opened it’s doors on Friday in Myrtle Beach, South Carolina. The store will sale memorabilia associated with Bart Simpson, his parents, Homer and Marge, sisters Lisa and Maggie and the rest of the globally known characters from the town of Springfield.

“This is the first, world’s first authentic Kwik-E-Mart. Every inch of this store is themed, including bringing products to life,” Mark Cornell, senior vice president of attractions development with simEx-Iwerks Entertainment, told WMBF News.

“The products that are on the show, you can actually come and experience in the store first hand. Sort of like getting a taste of the show.” Back in 2007, 7-Eleven converted a few of their chains into small-scale versions of the convenience store as a way of promoting the release of The Simpsons Movie. This newly-opened Kwik-E-Mart offers fans a much more immersive experience that allows them to see (and even taste) what it would be like to actually live in Springfield.

There is also similar version of the store opened in Universal Studios Orlando.

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Snoop And Matt Barnes Team Up For Cancer Benefit

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Snoop Dogg and Matt Barnes continue to help support the fight against cancer. On Sunday, the two stars held the fifth annual Athletes vs. Cancer All-Star Weekend.

Barnes created the nonprofit Athletes vs. Cancer (AVC) in memory of his mother, who died just 26 days after being diagnosed with stage four cancer, according to the organization’s website.

“This nonprofit is a community of influencers — musicians, athletes, actors — who come together to bring awareness to cancer but also support families who are harmed by cancer,” said Holly Baird, communications director for AVC. “They provide scholarships, care packages and all-around support for families.”

Heisman Trophy winner Reggie Bush also participated at the event.

“I think everybody here has been affected in some way, shape or form by cancer. Obviously, it’s a nasty disease. It’s taken a lot of people way too soon. I’ve been affected by it, close family members, friends, co-workers, and so I’ve known Matt and Snoop for a long time and they’ve supported me for a long time, so it’s only right that I come to support them.”

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Randy Moss Pays Tribute To Police Brutality Victims

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Former NFL wide receiver Randy Moss is now in the NFL Hall Of Fame. Moss stepped to the podium with a tie with the names of victims from Police Brutality.

The tie had the names of including Eric Garner, Tamir Rice, Sandra Bland, Alton Sterling, and Travyon Martin to name a few.

“What I wanted to express with my tie was to let these families know they’re not alone,” Moss said. “I’m not here voicing, but by [having] these names on my tie, in a big platform like the Pro Football Hall of Fame, there’s a lot of stuff going on in our country and I just wanted these family members to know they’re not alone.”

 

 

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